How to know when the time is right for a rebrand

Your branding is the face of your company; therefore, arguably, it is one of the most important aspects of your business. 

If you believe you’ve reached a stagnant point as a company, or are simply seeking a refresh, then rebranding may be the key to unlocking new potential for your company, 

While the concept may be daunting, it could be worth considering if you’re struggling to align with your customers’ demands and expectations.  

In the past, brands have faced backlash from consumers due to rebranding, as they haven’t done their research or thought about their audience, leading to confusion and frustration. 

So, how exactly do you know if it’s the right time for a brand refresh? 

Your brand image no longer aligns with your vision 

It’s evident that as time goes on, brand names can become outdated due to a flurry of different reasons – from the cultural context changing, to the fact that it may not represent what your brand stands for anymore. 

A strong brand name is your main touchpoint with consumers. 

While helping to differentiate yourself from competitors, a good brand name ensures your company is memorable. 

Remember, if you’re wanting to rename, research is vital as businesses may already occupy the name, alongside trademark vetting and URL research.  

You’re failing to differentiate from competitors 

A key indicator it’s time to rebrand is when you’re failing to stand out against the crowd. 

Branding is all about competitive differentiation, and being able to communicate what sets you apart from the rest ensures you can remain at the forefront of consumers’ minds. 

By focusing on your competitive advantage, you can define your brand

If you’re wanting to tap into a new target market, it could be time to consider rebranding, in order to align with a specific audience. 

Fostering brand loyalty among new segments starts with ensuring your brand is relevant to their needs, so be sure to conduct your research into the behaviours, attitudes and demands of that demographic. 

Essentially, a rebrand enables you to redefine yourself with the goal of reaching untapped audiences. 

PR campaigns need a 360-degree approach  

When it comes to planning your next impactful PR campaign, it goes without saying that you need to consider all aspects of your approach. PR is not just media relations; it encompasses all external communications, and with so many digital platforms available to share content on, and the impact and reach of these constantly evolving, your PR campaign needs to be managed strategically.

Some aspects of ‘traditional’ PR, for example press releases, are mainstays, but you are more likely to have a successful campaign if you implement aspects of digital PR alongside traditional efforts.

To get the best results for your campaigns, applying the PESO media model will help to ensure that any PR strategy implemented is covering all ground.

The acronym stands for Paid, Earned, Shared and Owned (PESO) media, and this framework is most beneficial when used as a planning tool to integrate different forms of media.

This framework was first introduced by Gini Dietrich, founder and CEO of marketing and communications firm, Arment Dietrich, in her 2014 book – Spin Sucks: Communication and Reputation Management in the Digital Age.

The PESO Model

Paid

Paid media is fast becoming a top feature of PR campaigns. This form of media uses; ambient advertising, sales promotion, PPC and SEO to place money behind the content to boost and control its distribution. When using paid media, it is important that you choose platforms to target according to the right audience, to yield the best results and avoid wasting your money.

You can monitor the average click through rate percentage and average cost per click to see if the advert is on track to achieve the objectives set at the beginning of the campaign. Selective and tailored messaging on platforms such as Facebook and Instagram will ensure that any messages resonate.

Earned

Earned media is a form of third-party endorsement. This can be achieved through more traditional media relations or through blogger and influencer relations. When used correctly, influencer marketing can generate 11x the ROI of traditional ads*.

The use of influencers can help your brand to reach new niche audiences with dedicated interests, while raising your profile across channels and platforms, in addition to many other benefits.

Shared

Shared media is also referred to as content marketing. It is centred around pushing content through social channels, but can also include affinity marketing, review sites and partnerships.

Affinity marketing is an aspect of PR that consists of a partnership between a company and an organisation that gathers persons sharing the same interests, to bring a greater consumer base to their services, products and opinions. A long-lasting relationship can be formed using this concept, in which both parties’ benefit. This can be rewarding especially during difficult times such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

Owned

Owned media describes any content and channel over which your company or organisation has complete control. It includes websites, publications, presentations, research, podcasts and webinars.

When used correctly, owned media channels can be successfully used to establish your company or organisation as thought leaders, whilst building long-term customer relationships.

At the centre of the PESO model is Authority. Optimised, shareable and engaging content should be a golden aim for any campaign alongside Google authorship.

The most successful PR campaigns have a tailored and strategic approach and utilising the relationship between all the media forms in the PESO model can ensure that your next PR campaign is launched with a foolproof strategy behind it.

Get in touch with us today to discover how your next PR campaign can reach its full potential.

*https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/the-brand-value-of-influencer-marketing-in-2018-infographic/520810/

 

Entering the world of PR: what my first four months has taught me

 

Tamara Samuel at Jennie Holland PR in Nottingham

By Tamara Samuel

This month will mark four months since I embarked on my public relations journey and began my first professional job in the world of PR as an account executive at Jennie Holland PR.

I want to lend a little advice to those considering a career in PR by summarising a few things that I have learned during my first four months of working in the industry.

Believe in your abilities

Starting my first ‘big girl’ job has taught me how to have confidence in the skills I already possessed before starting. I began this role shortly after graduating from Nottingham Trent University and was excited but also a little nervous. I was eager to begin my career in the world of PR but slightly apprehensive about being new to everything public relations.

Little did I know that a lot of the skills I learned during university would be transferable into my PR role, even though I didn’t specifically have a public relations degree. I learned how to apply my skills to relevant scenarios in my current role.

Juggling essay deadlines, two part-time jobs and my extracurricular cheerleading activities unknowingly shaped me into a great multitasker, whilst fine-tuning my communication skills. These university experiences taught me how to prioritise my time which has been an incredibly useful skill for working in PR.

Every day is different

PR is a varied, exciting and fast-paced career choice. I love how each day is different from the last, my first four months have taught me how to be flexible and adaptable.

PR teams all have their own way of doing things and experiencing different agencies during my past internships strengthened my ability to adapt. From copywriting to researching to social media management, I gained the ability to juggle them all.

The smaller the agency the more varied the role. My agency is small which certainly has its perks, my work is never limited to one sector. I could be writing an architectural press release mid-morning then drafting social media posts for a legal client by lunch.

Don’t be afraid to ask questions

I was a little nervous on my first day when I first stepped into the JHPR office, but I had no reason to be. The team were all so helpful and welcoming from the very start. The PR industry has taught me that you never stop learning. Never be afraid to ask questions because you can gain a wealth of knowledge from the people around you and their experiences.

I have only been working in PR world for four months and I have already attended award ceremonies, team away days and networking events and have seen the team secure amazing pieces of media coverage for our clients, reaching an audience of 1.5 billion people in 2019 alone. I can’t wait to see what the future holds for my career in PR.

 

Thinking about a career in public relations? Chat to us today at hello@jenniehollandpr.com

Follow Tamara on Twitter @tamarasamuelpr

How to gain social media followers

Having a successful social media presence is a vital part of any marketing strategy, and gaining social media followers is a measurable metric on how well you’re performing.

Recently, Jennifer Aniston broke the world record for gaining the highest number of social followers in a short space of time with just one post, so we thought we’d share a few of our top tips on how you can increase your social media followers.

Produce quality content

We say it so often, but content really is king. Not only is this going to get you followers, but it’s also going to keep them. Ensure your content is timely and relevant, as well as visually appealing. If you don’t have access to a bank of professionally taken images – some good lighting and a smartphone camera can surprise you.

Know your audience

Once you understand your audience, you will understand what type of content they are most likely to engage with. You don’t just have to post about yourself and your company updates – post about and comment on relevant and topical things in the industry that your audience will find interesting. This can be anything from news articles to product announcements or policy changes.

Include social media platforms on external marketing materials

Ensure links to your social profiles are on your website and on your email signature. Sometimes customers and clients just aren’t aware that you are active on these profiles, and with social media being a real time update of what’s going on in the business, it’s important for people who support your brand to have the latest news direct to their feed. It also increases your chances of having repeat customers as they can keep up to date with the latest products and services, and as well as finding out about offers.

Remain active

Ensure you post continuously to show your audience you are active on social media. By posting regularly you can easily ensure your content is up to date, and your social media followers will constantly be reminded of you. They may not want to buy a product or service from you at that time, but when the time comes there is more chance of them thinking of you if you have posted recently. We recommend posting a few times a week across multiple platforms.

Interact with other accounts

Interact and follow accounts that are relevant to your industry or in your community. Not only will this build your presence online but fans of people you interact with could be led to your profile. Tag other people and pages where relevant to extend visibility to reach their pages. Following a customer or client could also be good way to get their attention and lead them to your profile.

Use relevant hashtags

Look at trends as well as hashtags and see if you can latch on to anything topical. If you have your own hashtag, make sure people are aware. Put your hashtag in your bio so your customers can tag in their own posts to get your attention. If you don’t want to shove a load of hashtags at the end of a post just for the sake of it, tag up a few keywords in the copy of your post.

While our tips might not get you enough followers to break the internet like Jennifer Aniston did, it can certainly increase your social media popularity, raising brand awareness and driving sales. Get in touch with Jennie Holland PR today and we can help you design and deliver and a successful social media strategy.

What are brand archetypes and why do they matter?

For business leaders, there has never before been so many resources available when it comes to shouting about your brand, products and services.

But in this competitive digital multiverse of content, social media platforms, celebrities and influencers, it is easy for your brand to become lost in all of the noise without a clear personality that shapes all of your online presence.

All brands have an identity – defining it depends on how you want to interact with your target audience, the products and services that your company offers and where your specialisms lie.

Do you sell advice, technology or something you’ve created?

Do you use specialist skills, rely on your industry contacts, or invest heavily in research and development to stay ahead of the competition?

How should consumers feel when they see or buy your product or service?

The answers to these questions are a good place to start when defining your brand’s personality – in the early 20th century, Swiss psychiatrist and psychoanalyst Carl Jung developed a list of universal brand archetypes that can be identified in all aspects of life, from our dreams and religions to our art and fairy tales.

Now, these brand archetypes have been adopted by advertising professionals all over the world as a way of visualising and summarising a brand’s identity, helping it to connect more effectively with the consumer.

Brands can fit broadly into one, sometimes two, of the following 12 Brand Archetypes:

  • The Innocent – pure, simple, trustworthy and safe

Example: Coca Cola

  • The Sage – wise, understanding and truth-seeking

Example: Trip Advisor

  • The Explorer – adventurous, free, ambitious and spiritual

Example: North Face

  • The Outlaw or Rebel – free-spirited, brave, agent of change and unconventional

Example: Virgin

  • The Magician – making dreams come true

Example: Disney

  • The Hero – determined, skilful and ruthless

Example: Nike

  • The Everyman – relatable, reliable, empathetic and connects with others

Example: PG Tips

  • The Jester – playful, joyful and carefree

Example: Paddy Power

  • The Lover – passionate, romantic and committed

Example: Chanel

  • The Caregiver or Nurturer – compassionate, generous and strong

Example: Johnson & Johnson

  • The Ruler – in control, confident, firm but fair

Example: Mercedes

  • The Creator – innovative, imaginative and expressive

Example: Lego

Which archetype best aligns with your company’s products, industry reputation and specialities?

Once you’ve decided, have a look at globally renowned brands and see what they are talking about on social media, on their website and in their adverts. You’ll begin to notice the consistencies and patterns in the language they use and the images they portray – and you can do the same with your brand’s online presence and marketing materials, to build an identity that your customers will come to recognise and trust.

Interested in learning more about our social media services? We can help. Get in touch with Jennie Holland PR for all things social on 0115 998 3048 or hello@jenniehollandpr.com

Eight reasons why businesses of all sizes need PR

In this increasingly digital age, when so many brands are vying for the attention of over-saturated audiences, ensuring that your company’s messaging and services are in the public domain is more important than ever.

Whether you have a start-up in its delicate early stages, a medium sized enterprise or a large long-established corporation with hundreds of years of heritage, the positive impact of good PR should not be underestimated.

In order to keep one step ahead of the competition, or in the arena with other competitors altogether, having a presence in the media and on social media is crucial and PR professionals will ensure that your messaging and brand is out there in the right places at the right time.

Simply put, good strategic PR will help your business get off the ground and stay off the ground by getting your brand noticed to increase your profile, credibility and sales.

A PR company will do this by starting relevant conversations that engage and influence your customers, provoking action. By reaching those audiences through clever PR, social media and other on and offline communications tools, a PR professional will get people reading, talking and sharing news about your brand to strengthen your reputation.

Eight reasons why your business needs PR:

1. To protect your reputation

Reputation is key and the more positive news in the public domain about your company the better, whether it’s new work appointments, project announcements, charity efforts or financial growth reports – if there is news to tell then we should tell it.

2. Reach your target audience

A PR professional will use media contacts to communicate your messaging to the publications and online sites that are read by your target audiences. Social media management will also allow a PR company to act on behalf of your brand – liaising with customers in keeping with your brand’s tone of voice and developing relationships to ensure a personable and accessible approach.

3. To communicate brand values

Your brand values are at the core of your business, they are what sets you apart from the rest and what promotes authenticity and the unique qualities of your company.

4. Raise awareness of your services

Raising awareness of your brand highlights your products and services and helps drive consumers to make decisions. It’s as clear as that – if people don’t know about you, they won’t choose your company.

5. Keep your business looking alive

There’s nothing worse than neglected social media channels, a blog page that hasn’t been updated since 2018 and no mention of your company in the press. Good PR and social media can help keep your business looking fresh and healthy, which is invaluable for attracting consumer interest and investment.

6. Establish credibility

If a brand isn’t credible or loses its credibility in some way then this can have a negative effect on consumers’ decisions and their behaviour due to the loss of trust. They will choose an alternative company if they lose their faith, so it’s important to look after brand image to ensure this doesn’t happen.

7. To provoke action

Your core communication through press releases and social media content should influence action. Through the creation and placement of strategic content, a good PR professional can ensure that target audiences are provoked in such a way that it benefits business, either through driving sales or getting people talking.

8. Manage a crisis

Should your business hit crisis point, things can escalate quickly and it’s important that your reputation is protected until things begin to resolve. From reactive press and social statements to providing advice to lead you through a difficult time, a good PR company can handle this.