The importance of influencers in PR campaigns

Social media influencers are everywhere today, and subconsciously or not we are influenced by what they say. Followers trust what their favourite influencers say, so working with them is crucial to your marketing strategy for your PR campaigns. In fact, the influencer marketing industry is set to reach $16.4B (£13.5B) in 2022.*

What is an influencer?

Influencers, as you may have guessed, influence people via social media by sharing what they do in a day, what they may be buying and their hobbies, typically with a significant following. Not all influencers have millions of followers … nano and micro influencers, for instance, might have between 1,000 and 50,000 followers, whilst celebrity influencers, such as Kylie Jenner and Ariana Grande, will have hundreds of millions.

What do influencers add?

Companies will choose the influencers they want to work with based on their business goals. They may want to choose people who reflect their characteristics, such as a baby company wanting to collaborate with a mum; or a company may want to target its audience at an older or younger demographic. When done right, influencers can be the key to boosting a company and its profits.

Successful influencer campaigns

  • Daniel Wellington: In 2011, founder Filip Tysander used $15,000 to launch an influencer campaign on social media, which he now owes much of his success to. In a time when influencers were not everywhere you turned, Tysander took a chance on this new way of marketing, and it paid off. He would exchange a watch to micro influencers in return for a post featuring the watch, quoting the brand. Today, Daniel Wellington is worth an estimated $35.87 million** and partners with the likes of Hailey Bieber and Kendall Jenner.

 

  • Dunkin’ Donuts: 2020 saw the then most followed person on TikTok, Charli D’amelio, collaborate with Dunkin’ Donuts releasing a drink titled ‘The Charli’. Her 95 million followers responded extremely positively to the campaign, and over the next year, Dunkin’ held a competition on TikTok with the #dunkinmenucontest gaining 43.5 million views. Charli and Dunkin collaborated on merchandise that sold out and ‘The Charli Cold Foam’ was released. Since the first drink came out, 3/4 sales skyrocketed; there was a 57% increase in app downloads and a 20% increase in cold brew sales.*** This campaign also allowed Dunkin’ to expand their consumer base to teenagers and children.

 

  • Levi’s: In April last year, the brand worked with six celebrities/influencers, from rapper Jaden Smith to youtuber Emma Chamberlain to climate activist Xiye Bastide, in their ‘Buy Better, Wear Longer’ campaign. For Levi’s, the ad was ‘a call-to-action for Gen Zers, urging them to reuse, repurpose and reduce their consumer footprint.’**** The various industries the influencers came from, and their different supporters, brought a wide variety of potential new customers. After the first half of 2021, Levi’s profits were up 198% … yet another great example of influencer marketing.*****

 

The influencer marketing industry is rapidly growing, so if you are not using this strategy, it may worth your time of day!

Contact our team at Jennie Holland PR for a chat on how influencer marketing could work for your next project.

 

* https://influencermarketinghub.com/influencer-marketing-statistics/

** https://www.networthspot.com/danielwellington/net-worth/instagram/

***https://neoreach.com/the-charli/

****https://www.thedrum.com/news/2021/04/19/levi-s-enlists-jaden-smith-top-gen-z-influencers-first-global-campaign-3-years

*****https://www.forbes.com/sites/shelleykohan/2021/07/08/levi-profits-skyrocket-198-as-denim-trend-continues-to-evolve/?sh=37ef554f4b0d

Lockdown 3.0 and the property market – should the stamp duty holiday be extended?

Despite the uncertainty of the last few months, as well as the government announcing a third lockdown at the start of the year – the property market is one sector that remains strong and buoyant in a period of economic turbulence.

As PR specialists based in the East Midlands, we work with many clients across the country in the property and construction industry, keeping up to date with the latest market news and monitoring its overall performance and ups and downs, to ensure we provide the best service for our clients.

In 2020, chancellor Rishi Sunak announced a stamp duty holiday until 31 March 2021, its aim, to increase public demand for housing and help buyers cut some of the costs associated with getting onto the housing ladder. These efforts to boost the sale of properties during a difficult period proved to be much-needed fuel for the economy.

Moving house during lockdown
Image: www.pexels.com

During the changing lockdown restrictions and circumstances of 2020, the housing market initially suffered a slump during the second quarter when it came to a halt. Following the reopening of the market, pent-up demand saw house prices and sales rise rapidly as people looked to buy and sell quickly and take advantage of the time-limited stamp duty holiday in order to save money.

House prices have since seen a dramatic climb over the last few months – the highest ever in fact – with the average house price in the UK now at a record £253,374*.

As the March 2021 stamp duty holiday deadline looms closer, leading property experts and businesses are calling for the government to extend the holiday to take the third lockdown into account and further drive forward the market.

The positives of extending the incentive would benefit prospective homebuyers and the market as a whole, and given the current lockdown, an extension may be the slice of good news buyers need to take the plunge and complete house purchases.

Despite the housing market adopting a position of ‘business as usual’, the restrictions on staying at home mean that transactions are taking longer – with people unable to complete and submit paperwork quickly, and estate agents, brokers, solicitors and lenders working from home and having to adapt to new methods and practices to accommodate the demand from customers.

Therefore, an extension of the stamp duty holiday would ease some of this pressure, allowing more time for transactions to be completed.

Though there has been some criticism towards the stamp duty holiday, with experts claiming that it may have hindered some buyers from purchasing a home rather than helping them, there is no doubt that the incentive was always designed to be a temporary fix to bolster the market, which seems to have been effective on the whole.

As one of the biggest drivers of the economy, it is seen by many in the industry as vital that the government extends the scheme once more, as we potentially face many more months of national economic instability.

Jennie Holland PR has extensive experience and expertise working with dynamic companies in the property, construction and law industries, including FHP Living, G F Tomlinson, JMP Solicitors, Taggart Homes, ALB Group, Influence, Howard Ward Associates and Land & New Homes Network. We implement targeted PR and digital marketing strategies to bolster your brands online and offline presence; by securing articles with backlinks in high domain authority media and providing a result-driven social media management service.

We can help you become famous amongst your target audiences. Contact us today to start your new year PR journey and let’s meet those targets together in 2021.

*https://www.express.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/1381445/house-prices-rishi-sunak-extend-stamp-duty-deadline

Functions of social media for businesses

Having a presence on social media is VITAL for any business, and it’s becoming even more important in the modern age.

There was a time when social media was just for networking between friends. Now, it is arguably the biggest communication channel in the world. Updates can reach audiences in seconds, with user-created content making impressions across the globe.

For business owners, social media is a free online communications tool which should contain the most accessible and up to date information about your business.

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, social media has grown to be even more valuable for companies, as a first port of call for up to date information. How many of us headed to social media pages to check if businesses were open or looking active during lockdown?

Whether you own a B2C or B2B business, having a presence on social media is still vital to show current and potential clients what your business can do, what your brand represents and of course that your business is open for communication.

We’ve outlined some of the key functions of social media for businesses:

To build your reputation

Social media is a way to project your brand’s personality through short written updates. Using specific language and tones can indicate to others what your brand stands for and the kind of business you are – friendly and casual, or serious and professional.

As a customer service advisor

Potential customers looking for quick answers can communicate quickly and effectively by sending direct messages on social, or by commenting on the feed of a specific channel.

Through utilising the messenger and comment features of channels, you can interact quickly and efficiently with customers for better service.

An up to date image gallery

Posting regular images will give clients and customers a visual idea of your business. Post images of your office, team and offering to let people know what you are up to and how you are evolving.

Attracting talent

Social media can be a great way to show off your office culture, attracting potential future employees to the team. You can show people why your business is truly a great place to work and leave a good impression for when you are next recruiting.

To let people know you are modern and active

If you don’t post on social media regularly, it can be questioned as to whether your business is still operating. Ensure posting is frequent so you are always in your followers’ minds, and to show social visitors you are still up and running.

At the very least, try to have at least one active social channel to show people that you are a forward-thinking business that utilises modern technology.

Showing support

Social media is a good way to engage with others and show your support. Whether this is support for the local community, a charity, or other affiliated businesses. It’s a useful tool for networking and connecting with those who are important to your business.

Speak to us at Jennie Holland PR, we are an experienced and skilled social media management team who can put the above and so much more into place for you. We will guide you through it and bring your business real results.

Social media consumption post lockdown – what’s changed?

It’s been six months since the UK went into lockdown, and with so many people saving commuting time or being placed on Furlough Leave from their job, many of us had more free time than we have ever had before. The time spent on social media in the UK surged, with the average user spending four hours and two minutes a day scrolling through social media apps as a way to soak up free time.

Apps like Tik Tok are notorious for creating that casino slot machine lost time experience. It notably doesn’t have the time or a clock visible on the screen when using the app. Is this to ensure users lose track of time and continue to scroll through the infinite content? With increased screen time and saturation of content, many users are starting to pay close attention to how they are using social media platforms, to ensure that they are getting the most out of it without letting it take over their life.

What can brands learn from this and how can they ensure that their social media content is engaging and ethical?

Use trusted sources only

Users want credibility behind the posts and the content they are consuming. We all remember the misinformation and WhatsApp forwards that were circulated at the start of the pandemic – posts which stated that drinking lemon juice or taking hot baths could help fight off coronavirus – spread like wildfire across the internet. These were later ruled as false, misleading information. As a reaction to this, WhatsApp launched its ‘Coronavirus Information Hub’ in March 2020, which aimed to work alongside UNICEF UNDP, and WHO to tackle the spread of fake news and keep its global users informed about the pandemic.

Users want to know where the information they are consuming is coming from and whether they should believe it. When brands are posting content, it’s important they are from a trusted source or backed up by factual information as to not spread misinformation.

Take responsibility

Users are also taking time out from social media for mental health reasons. One of the more recent campaigns was the #digitaldetoxday on 5 September, where users announced to their followers that they would be taking 24 hours away from their screens to bring awareness to the way social media affects users’ mental health. The campaign was created by YouTuber, Zoe Sugg, mental health organisation #IAMWHOLE and Lush, to encourage users to reflect offline about how they live their lives online, and to introduce boundaries into their social media usage. Love Island presenter, Laura Whitmore, announced to her 1.2 million Instagram followers that she would be taking part in the campaign by taking a brief social media break to focus on herself.

The way users consume social media has changed dramatically over the last six months. Users are hyper-aware and expect truth and credibility when viewing posts. It is important that brands stay transparent when communicating with consumers and customers and are using social media platforms responsibly.

If you’d like help to ensure your social media channels remain engaging but credible, please get in touch with Jennie Holland PR.

PR campaigns need a 360-degree approach  

When it comes to planning your next impactful PR campaign, it goes without saying that you need to consider all aspects of your approach. PR is not just media relations; it encompasses all external communications, and with so many digital platforms available to share content on, and the impact and reach of these constantly evolving, your PR campaign needs to be managed strategically.

Some aspects of ‘traditional’ PR, for example press releases, are mainstays, but you are more likely to have a successful campaign if you implement aspects of digital PR alongside traditional efforts.

To get the best results for your campaigns, applying the PESO media model will help to ensure that any PR strategy implemented is covering all ground.

The acronym stands for Paid, Earned, Shared and Owned (PESO) media, and this framework is most beneficial when used as a planning tool to integrate different forms of media.

This framework was first introduced by Gini Dietrich, founder and CEO of marketing and communications firm, Arment Dietrich, in her 2014 book – Spin Sucks: Communication and Reputation Management in the Digital Age.

The PESO Model

Paid

Paid media is fast becoming a top feature of PR campaigns. This form of media uses; ambient advertising, sales promotion, PPC and SEO to place money behind the content to boost and control its distribution. When using paid media, it is important that you choose platforms to target according to the right audience, to yield the best results and avoid wasting your money.

You can monitor the average click through rate percentage and average cost per click to see if the advert is on track to achieve the objectives set at the beginning of the campaign. Selective and tailored messaging on platforms such as Facebook and Instagram will ensure that any messages resonate.

Earned

Earned media is a form of third-party endorsement. This can be achieved through more traditional media relations or through blogger and influencer relations. When used correctly, influencer marketing can generate 11x the ROI of traditional ads*.

The use of influencers can help your brand to reach new niche audiences with dedicated interests, while raising your profile across channels and platforms, in addition to many other benefits.

Shared

Shared media is also referred to as content marketing. It is centred around pushing content through social channels, but can also include affinity marketing, review sites and partnerships.

Affinity marketing is an aspect of PR that consists of a partnership between a company and an organisation that gathers persons sharing the same interests, to bring a greater consumer base to their services, products and opinions. A long-lasting relationship can be formed using this concept, in which both parties’ benefit. This can be rewarding especially during difficult times such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

Owned

Owned media describes any content and channel over which your company or organisation has complete control. It includes websites, publications, presentations, research, podcasts and webinars.

When used correctly, owned media channels can be successfully used to establish your company or organisation as thought leaders, whilst building long-term customer relationships.

At the centre of the PESO model is Authority. Optimised, shareable and engaging content should be a golden aim for any campaign alongside Google authorship.

The most successful PR campaigns have a tailored and strategic approach and utilising the relationship between all the media forms in the PESO model can ensure that your next PR campaign is launched with a foolproof strategy behind it.

Get in touch with us today to discover how your next PR campaign can reach its full potential.

*https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/the-brand-value-of-influencer-marketing-in-2018-infographic/520810/

 

Entering the world of PR: what my first four months has taught me

 

Tamara Samuel at Jennie Holland PR in Nottingham

By Tamara Samuel

This month will mark four months since I embarked on my public relations journey and began my first professional job in the world of PR as an account executive at Jennie Holland PR.

I want to lend a little advice to those considering a career in PR by summarising a few things that I have learned during my first four months of working in the industry.

Believe in your abilities

Starting my first ‘big girl’ job has taught me how to have confidence in the skills I already possessed before starting. I began this role shortly after graduating from Nottingham Trent University and was excited but also a little nervous. I was eager to begin my career in the world of PR but slightly apprehensive about being new to everything public relations.

Little did I know that a lot of the skills I learned during university would be transferable into my PR role, even though I didn’t specifically have a public relations degree. I learned how to apply my skills to relevant scenarios in my current role.

Juggling essay deadlines, two part-time jobs and my extracurricular cheerleading activities unknowingly shaped me into a great multitasker, whilst fine-tuning my communication skills. These university experiences taught me how to prioritise my time which has been an incredibly useful skill for working in PR.

Every day is different

PR is a varied, exciting and fast-paced career choice. I love how each day is different from the last, my first four months have taught me how to be flexible and adaptable.

PR teams all have their own way of doing things and experiencing different agencies during my past internships strengthened my ability to adapt. From copywriting to researching to social media management, I gained the ability to juggle them all.

The smaller the agency the more varied the role. My agency is small which certainly has its perks, my work is never limited to one sector. I could be writing an architectural press release mid-morning then drafting social media posts for a legal client by lunch.

Don’t be afraid to ask questions

I was a little nervous on my first day when I first stepped into the JHPR office, but I had no reason to be. The team were all so helpful and welcoming from the very start. The PR industry has taught me that you never stop learning. Never be afraid to ask questions because you can gain a wealth of knowledge from the people around you and their experiences.

I have only been working in PR world for four months and I have already attended award ceremonies, team away days and networking events and have seen the team secure amazing pieces of media coverage for our clients, reaching an audience of 1.5 billion people in 2019 alone. I can’t wait to see what the future holds for my career in PR.

 

Thinking about a career in public relations? Chat to us today at hello@jenniehollandpr.com

Follow Tamara on Twitter @tamarasamuelpr

How to gain social media followers

Having a successful social media presence is a vital part of any marketing strategy, and gaining social media followers is a measurable metric on how well you’re performing.

Recently, Jennifer Aniston broke the world record for gaining the highest number of social followers in a short space of time with just one post, so we thought we’d share a few of our top tips on how you can increase your social media followers.

Produce quality content

We say it so often, but content really is king. Not only is this going to get you followers, but it’s also going to keep them. Ensure your content is timely and relevant, as well as visually appealing. If you don’t have access to a bank of professionally taken images – some good lighting and a smartphone camera can surprise you.

Know your audience

Once you understand your audience, you will understand what type of content they are most likely to engage with. You don’t just have to post about yourself and your company updates – post about and comment on relevant and topical things in the industry that your audience will find interesting. This can be anything from news articles to product announcements or policy changes.

Include social media platforms on external marketing materials

Ensure links to your social profiles are on your website and on your email signature. Sometimes customers and clients just aren’t aware that you are active on these profiles, and with social media being a real time update of what’s going on in the business, it’s important for people who support your brand to have the latest news direct to their feed. It also increases your chances of having repeat customers as they can keep up to date with the latest products and services, and as well as finding out about offers.

Remain active

Ensure you post continuously to show your audience you are active on social media. By posting regularly you can easily ensure your content is up to date, and your social media followers will constantly be reminded of you. They may not want to buy a product or service from you at that time, but when the time comes there is more chance of them thinking of you if you have posted recently. We recommend posting a few times a week across multiple platforms.

Interact with other accounts

Interact and follow accounts that are relevant to your industry or in your community. Not only will this build your presence online but fans of people you interact with could be led to your profile. Tag other people and pages where relevant to extend visibility to reach their pages. Following a customer or client could also be good way to get their attention and lead them to your profile.

Use relevant hashtags

Look at trends as well as hashtags and see if you can latch on to anything topical. If you have your own hashtag, make sure people are aware. Put your hashtag in your bio so your customers can tag in their own posts to get your attention. If you don’t want to shove a load of hashtags at the end of a post just for the sake of it, tag up a few keywords in the copy of your post.

While our tips might not get you enough followers to break the internet like Jennifer Aniston did, it can certainly increase your social media popularity, raising brand awareness and driving sales. Get in touch with Jennie Holland PR today and we can help you design and deliver and a successful social media strategy.

What are brand archetypes and why do they matter?

For business leaders, there has never before been so many resources available when it comes to shouting about your brand, products and services.

But in this competitive digital multiverse of content, social media platforms, celebrities and influencers, it is easy for your brand to become lost in all of the noise without a clear personality that shapes all of your online presence.

All brands have an identity – defining it depends on how you want to interact with your target audience, the products and services that your company offers and where your specialisms lie.

Do you sell advice, technology or something you’ve created?

Do you use specialist skills, rely on your industry contacts, or invest heavily in research and development to stay ahead of the competition?

How should consumers feel when they see or buy your product or service?

The answers to these questions are a good place to start when defining your brand’s personality – in the early 20th century, Swiss psychiatrist and psychoanalyst Carl Jung developed a list of universal brand archetypes that can be identified in all aspects of life, from our dreams and religions to our art and fairy tales.

Now, these brand archetypes have been adopted by advertising professionals all over the world as a way of visualising and summarising a brand’s identity, helping it to connect more effectively with the consumer.

Brands can fit broadly into one, sometimes two, of the following 12 Brand Archetypes:

  • The Innocent – pure, simple, trustworthy and safe

Example: Coca Cola

  • The Sage – wise, understanding and truth-seeking

Example: Trip Advisor

  • The Explorer – adventurous, free, ambitious and spiritual

Example: North Face

  • The Outlaw or Rebel – free-spirited, brave, agent of change and unconventional

Example: Virgin

  • The Magician – making dreams come true

Example: Disney

  • The Hero – determined, skilful and ruthless

Example: Nike

  • The Everyman – relatable, reliable, empathetic and connects with others

Example: PG Tips

  • The Jester – playful, joyful and carefree

Example: Paddy Power

  • The Lover – passionate, romantic and committed

Example: Chanel

  • The Caregiver or Nurturer – compassionate, generous and strong

Example: Johnson & Johnson

  • The Ruler – in control, confident, firm but fair

Example: Mercedes

  • The Creator – innovative, imaginative and expressive

Example: Lego

Which archetype best aligns with your company’s products, industry reputation and specialities?

Once you’ve decided, have a look at globally renowned brands and see what they are talking about on social media, on their website and in their adverts. You’ll begin to notice the consistencies and patterns in the language they use and the images they portray – and you can do the same with your brand’s online presence and marketing materials, to build an identity that your customers will come to recognise and trust.

Interested in learning more about our social media services? We can help. Get in touch with Jennie Holland PR for all things social on 0115 998 3048 or hello@jenniehollandpr.com

What are the benefits of sponsored social media posts?

While social media is a free tool to engage with your consumers, sometimes putting a little bit of spend behind your posts can be the boost you need to really reach your desired audience.

Platforms are changing their algorithm all the time and it can sometimes be hard to get your message seen by everybody. With sponsored social media posts you can ensure your content is appearing in the streams of your audience at the right time.

Whether you are a consumer brand or B2B company, sponsored posts can be beneficial for so many reasons. Here, we’ve chosen our favourites:

 

You can target your audience with sponsored social media posts

Everyone who has ever had a social media profile has a social footprint. Platforms gather your data from your age, gender, location, occupation and interests. When you set up a sponsored post, this allows you to target exactly who you’d like to see your content using multiple variables. With sponsored social media ads, quality over quantity is vital. You can target the demographic your product or service is aimed at to ensure the best result.

 

It’s relatively cheap

Sponsored posts start from £1 per day (though you won’t reach many people) and can go into the thousands. We recommend spending at least £10 a day over a seven to 14-day period for an effective, local advertisement. If you are targeting nationally you may want to think bigger – the more money you put behind an advertisement the more people you can reach. You can also set a spending limit to ensure you don’t go over budget.

 

There are multiple functions

Unlike a regular ad where the purpose is purely to sell a product, sponsored social media posts have a number of different functions. It can be anything from getting people to like your page, making people aware of an upcoming event or encouraging people to fill in a form to receive a quote. You can also use it to post and boost job roles when recruiting. Each platform has a variety of different uses, for example on Instagram you can use ads to drive more traffic and followers to your page, and with LinkedIn you can use it to find quality people for your job advertisements.

 

It’s easy to analyse the results

At the end of an ad campaign, you are able to view analytical data on the success of your sponsored social media post. This includes the total number of people reached from the ad as well as the total number of clicks to your website from the post. It is also easy to measure your page’s increase in followers since the campaign went live. For job posts, platforms collate them in an internal portal where you can view the hopeful applicants, as well as respond and post future advertisements.

 

You can be as friendly or formal as you like!

Unlike traditional ads, there is much more a relaxed attitude towards social media content. This is an opportunity for you to show people your brand and personality; not just your product. While you are targeting people through their profiles, you also need to target them with language. Create ads with the tone and style that represents your brand and relates to your audience, but also gives your business a voice, rather than just being the product.

 

Interested in learning more? We can help. Get in touch with Jennie Holland PR for all things social on 0115 998 3048 or hello@jenniehollandpr.com

Eight reasons why businesses of all sizes need PR

In this increasingly digital age, when so many brands are vying for the attention of over-saturated audiences, ensuring that your company’s messaging and services are in the public domain is more important than ever.

Whether you have a start-up in its delicate early stages, a medium sized enterprise or a large long-established corporation with hundreds of years of heritage, the positive impact of good PR should not be underestimated.

In order to keep one step ahead of the competition, or in the arena with other competitors altogether, having a presence in the media and on social media is crucial and PR professionals will ensure that your messaging and brand is out there in the right places at the right time.

Simply put, good strategic PR will help your business get off the ground and stay off the ground by getting your brand noticed to increase your profile, credibility and sales.

A PR company will do this by starting relevant conversations that engage and influence your customers, provoking action. By reaching those audiences through clever PR, social media and other on and offline communications tools, a PR professional will get people reading, talking and sharing news about your brand to strengthen your reputation.

Eight reasons why your business needs PR:

1. To protect your reputation

Reputation is key and the more positive news in the public domain about your company the better, whether it’s new work appointments, project announcements, charity efforts or financial growth reports – if there is news to tell then we should tell it.

2. Reach your target audience

A PR professional will use media contacts to communicate your messaging to the publications and online sites that are read by your target audiences. Social media management will also allow a PR company to act on behalf of your brand – liaising with customers in keeping with your brand’s tone of voice and developing relationships to ensure a personable and accessible approach.

3. To communicate brand values

Your brand values are at the core of your business, they are what sets you apart from the rest and what promotes authenticity and the unique qualities of your company.

4. Raise awareness of your services

Raising awareness of your brand highlights your products and services and helps drive consumers to make decisions. It’s as clear as that – if people don’t know about you, they won’t choose your company.

5. Keep your business looking alive

There’s nothing worse than neglected social media channels, a blog page that hasn’t been updated since 2018 and no mention of your company in the press. Good PR and social media can help keep your business looking fresh and healthy, which is invaluable for attracting consumer interest and investment.

6. Establish credibility

If a brand isn’t credible or loses its credibility in some way then this can have a negative effect on consumers’ decisions and their behaviour due to the loss of trust. They will choose an alternative company if they lose their faith, so it’s important to look after brand image to ensure this doesn’t happen.

7. To provoke action

Your core communication through press releases and social media content should influence action. Through the creation and placement of strategic content, a good PR professional can ensure that target audiences are provoked in such a way that it benefits business, either through driving sales or getting people talking.

8. Manage a crisis

Should your business hit crisis point, things can escalate quickly and it’s important that your reputation is protected until things begin to resolve. From reactive press and social statements to providing advice to lead you through a difficult time, a good PR company can handle this.