Lockdown 3.0 and the property market – should the stamp duty holiday be extended?

Despite the uncertainty of the last few months, as well as the government announcing a third lockdown at the start of the year – the property market is one sector that remains strong and buoyant in a period of economic turbulence.

As PR specialists based in the East Midlands, we work with many clients across the country in the property and construction industry, keeping up to date with the latest market news and monitoring its overall performance and ups and downs, to ensure we provide the best service for our clients.

In 2020, chancellor Rishi Sunak announced a stamp duty holiday until 31 March 2021, its aim, to increase public demand for housing and help buyers cut some of the costs associated with getting onto the housing ladder. These efforts to boost the sale of properties during a difficult period proved to be much-needed fuel for the economy.

Moving house during lockdown
Image: www.pexels.com

During the changing lockdown restrictions and circumstances of 2020, the housing market initially suffered a slump during the second quarter when it came to a halt. Following the reopening of the market, pent-up demand saw house prices and sales rise rapidly as people looked to buy and sell quickly and take advantage of the time-limited stamp duty holiday in order to save money.

House prices have since seen a dramatic climb over the last few months – the highest ever in fact – with the average house price in the UK now at a record £253,374*.

As the March 2021 stamp duty holiday deadline looms closer, leading property experts and businesses are calling for the government to extend the holiday to take the third lockdown into account and further drive forward the market.

The positives of extending the incentive would benefit prospective homebuyers and the market as a whole, and given the current lockdown, an extension may be the slice of good news buyers need to take the plunge and complete house purchases.

Despite the housing market adopting a position of ‘business as usual’, the restrictions on staying at home mean that transactions are taking longer – with people unable to complete and submit paperwork quickly, and estate agents, brokers, solicitors and lenders working from home and having to adapt to new methods and practices to accommodate the demand from customers.

Therefore, an extension of the stamp duty holiday would ease some of this pressure, allowing more time for transactions to be completed.

Though there has been some criticism towards the stamp duty holiday, with experts claiming that it may have hindered some buyers from purchasing a home rather than helping them, there is no doubt that the incentive was always designed to be a temporary fix to bolster the market, which seems to have been effective on the whole.

As one of the biggest drivers of the economy, it is seen by many in the industry as vital that the government extends the scheme once more, as we potentially face many more months of national economic instability.

Jennie Holland PR has extensive experience and expertise working with dynamic companies in the property, construction and law industries, including FHP Living, G F Tomlinson, JMP Solicitors, Taggart Homes, ALB Group, Influence, Howard Ward Associates and Land & New Homes Network. We implement targeted PR and digital marketing strategies to bolster your brands online and offline presence; by securing articles with backlinks in high domain authority media and providing a result-driven social media management service.

We can help you become famous amongst your target audiences. Contact us today to start your new year PR journey and let’s meet those targets together in 2021.

*https://www.express.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/1381445/house-prices-rishi-sunak-extend-stamp-duty-deadline

PR campaigns need a 360-degree approach  

When it comes to planning your next impactful PR campaign, it goes without saying that you need to consider all aspects of your approach. PR is not just media relations; it encompasses all external communications, and with so many digital platforms available to share content on, and the impact and reach of these constantly evolving, your PR campaign needs to be managed strategically.

Some aspects of ‘traditional’ PR, for example press releases, are mainstays, but you are more likely to have a successful campaign if you implement aspects of digital PR alongside traditional efforts.

To get the best results for your campaigns, applying the PESO media model will help to ensure that any PR strategy implemented is covering all ground.

The acronym stands for Paid, Earned, Shared and Owned (PESO) media, and this framework is most beneficial when used as a planning tool to integrate different forms of media.

This framework was first introduced by Gini Dietrich, founder and CEO of marketing and communications firm, Arment Dietrich, in her 2014 book – Spin Sucks: Communication and Reputation Management in the Digital Age.

The PESO Model

Paid

Paid media is fast becoming a top feature of PR campaigns. This form of media uses; ambient advertising, sales promotion, PPC and SEO to place money behind the content to boost and control its distribution. When using paid media, it is important that you choose platforms to target according to the right audience, to yield the best results and avoid wasting your money.

You can monitor the average click through rate percentage and average cost per click to see if the advert is on track to achieve the objectives set at the beginning of the campaign. Selective and tailored messaging on platforms such as Facebook and Instagram will ensure that any messages resonate.

Earned

Earned media is a form of third-party endorsement. This can be achieved through more traditional media relations or through blogger and influencer relations. When used correctly, influencer marketing can generate 11x the ROI of traditional ads*.

The use of influencers can help your brand to reach new niche audiences with dedicated interests, while raising your profile across channels and platforms, in addition to many other benefits.

Shared

Shared media is also referred to as content marketing. It is centred around pushing content through social channels, but can also include affinity marketing, review sites and partnerships.

Affinity marketing is an aspect of PR that consists of a partnership between a company and an organisation that gathers persons sharing the same interests, to bring a greater consumer base to their services, products and opinions. A long-lasting relationship can be formed using this concept, in which both parties’ benefit. This can be rewarding especially during difficult times such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

Owned

Owned media describes any content and channel over which your company or organisation has complete control. It includes websites, publications, presentations, research, podcasts and webinars.

When used correctly, owned media channels can be successfully used to establish your company or organisation as thought leaders, whilst building long-term customer relationships.

At the centre of the PESO model is Authority. Optimised, shareable and engaging content should be a golden aim for any campaign alongside Google authorship.

The most successful PR campaigns have a tailored and strategic approach and utilising the relationship between all the media forms in the PESO model can ensure that your next PR campaign is launched with a foolproof strategy behind it.

Get in touch with us today to discover how your next PR campaign can reach its full potential.

*https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/the-brand-value-of-influencer-marketing-in-2018-infographic/520810/

 

What are brand archetypes and why do they matter?

For business leaders, there has never before been so many resources available when it comes to shouting about your brand, products and services.

But in this competitive digital multiverse of content, social media platforms, celebrities and influencers, it is easy for your brand to become lost in all of the noise without a clear personality that shapes all of your online presence.

All brands have an identity – defining it depends on how you want to interact with your target audience, the products and services that your company offers and where your specialisms lie.

Do you sell advice, technology or something you’ve created?

Do you use specialist skills, rely on your industry contacts, or invest heavily in research and development to stay ahead of the competition?

How should consumers feel when they see or buy your product or service?

The answers to these questions are a good place to start when defining your brand’s personality – in the early 20th century, Swiss psychiatrist and psychoanalyst Carl Jung developed a list of universal brand archetypes that can be identified in all aspects of life, from our dreams and religions to our art and fairy tales.

Now, these brand archetypes have been adopted by advertising professionals all over the world as a way of visualising and summarising a brand’s identity, helping it to connect more effectively with the consumer.

Brands can fit broadly into one, sometimes two, of the following 12 Brand Archetypes:

  • The Innocent – pure, simple, trustworthy and safe

Example: Coca Cola

  • The Sage – wise, understanding and truth-seeking

Example: Trip Advisor

  • The Explorer – adventurous, free, ambitious and spiritual

Example: North Face

  • The Outlaw or Rebel – free-spirited, brave, agent of change and unconventional

Example: Virgin

  • The Magician – making dreams come true

Example: Disney

  • The Hero – determined, skilful and ruthless

Example: Nike

  • The Everyman – relatable, reliable, empathetic and connects with others

Example: PG Tips

  • The Jester – playful, joyful and carefree

Example: Paddy Power

  • The Lover – passionate, romantic and committed

Example: Chanel

  • The Caregiver or Nurturer – compassionate, generous and strong

Example: Johnson & Johnson

  • The Ruler – in control, confident, firm but fair

Example: Mercedes

  • The Creator – innovative, imaginative and expressive

Example: Lego

Which archetype best aligns with your company’s products, industry reputation and specialities?

Once you’ve decided, have a look at globally renowned brands and see what they are talking about on social media, on their website and in their adverts. You’ll begin to notice the consistencies and patterns in the language they use and the images they portray – and you can do the same with your brand’s online presence and marketing materials, to build an identity that your customers will come to recognise and trust.

Interested in learning more about our social media services? We can help. Get in touch with Jennie Holland PR for all things social on 0115 998 3048 or hello@jenniehollandpr.com